All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players

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In what has become a somewhat impromptu series on the evolution of the English language, I just had to mention something I read whilst on holidays last weekend. I picked up Bill Bryson's take on the life of Shakespeare whilst away. I've been interested in the great mystery of Shakespeare's life for some time now. I own a copy of Nolan's "Shakespeare's Face" and have read numerous other accounts (or, more accurately, guesses) of his life and works. Add to this the fact that I have been wanting to start reading Bryson's "A Short History of Nearly Everything", and it was a fairly predictable attraction. Not incidentally, I'm intending to read his "The Mother Tongue" shortly too.

The book is quite short, and I finished it mere days after purchase - helped along by a few days in a warm climate with no pressing demands, I might add. It is written in true Bryson style, very conversational and light hearted, and he gives a lovely (or not so lovely, depending on your take on plague and wanton violence) picture of 16th century England, and Shakespeare's somewhat unassuming - so far as we can tell - place in it.

However, my favourite part is this discussion of some of the many words that Shakespeare (allegedly) introduced into the English language:

And there was never a better time to delve for pleasure in language than the sixteenth century, when novelty blew through English like a spring breeze. Some twelve thousand words, a phenomenal number, entered the language between 1500 and 1650, about half of them still in use today, and old words were employed in ways that had not been tried before. Nouns became verbs and adverbs; adverbs became adjectives. Expressions that could not grammatically have existed before - such as "breathing one's last" and "backing a horse", both coined by Shakespeare - were suddenly popping up everywhere. Double superlatives and double negatives - "the most unkindest cut of all" - troubled no one and allowed an additional degree of emphasis that has since been lost.

Bryson goes on to mention the notorious variability of spelling known in early English society, noting this little gem -
Perhaps nothing speaks more eloquently of the variability of spelling in the age than the fact that a dictionary published in 1604, A Table Alphabeticall of Hard Words, spelled "words" two ways on the title page.
Of course, it just goes to show that the language has been evolving apace for many hundreds of years. Indeed, despite the naysayers it is happening much slower now than it was back in Shakespeare's day. I can imagine that back then there were people (perhaps among the upper, educated, classes) who complained that artists such as he were mangling the language, and doing things the wrong way, although the attitude towards English was reasonably fluid then, thanks to Latin and French being considered 'proper'. Surely, as time went on, and English took hold first in business and legal matters, and later in the sciences, that there have been people unwilling to accept change, even as it occurs around them. Nothing has changed in that respect, I imagine, it's just that now they have access to the internet - and a world full of people reading their opinions. Hopefully, it won't impede the progress overly. Much as I still cringe a little at "truthiness", "coopetition" and "incentivise", I am completely capable of embracing the words that I like - "blogosphere" is one of my favourites, along with "jumping the shark" and "backronym". It's only a matter of time before the language evolves to the point that our grandchildren will be almost incomprehensible, and Shakespeare's scribblings will have taken another step towards total obscurity.


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